Fronteras Desk News

State officials will monitor threats of terrorism or illegal immigration, ranging from six miles south of the U.S.-Mexico border to roughly south of Tucson. If the threat seems real, the agency would warn the public.
Mar. 9, 2012
For the first time in its 19-year history, the San Diego Latino Film Festival's theme is Latinos in the U.S. It will also feature events with Latino television stars.
Mar. 9, 2012
Latinos are the fastest-growing group in the United States, and candidates for political office must increasingly stand up and take notice of how Latinos can affect their chance of getting elected. Share your thoughts on how Latinos will affect elections in 2012.
Mar. 9, 2012
Called "El Mundo Extraño" (a sidebar showcase that translates as The Strange World) will feature horror and science fiction films, plus supernatural stories. Filmmakers hope to find a distributor to share their work with a wider audience.
Mar. 9, 2012
'Lower Valley' or 'Mission Valley' in South El Paso County near the U.S.-Mexico border has a rich history as an active smuggling corridor for drugs and people. It is now getting a reputation as an area with many corrupt public officials.
Mar. 8, 2012
The co-director of the Tijuana-based "Zeta" magazine has been named one of Newsweek’s 150 “Women Who Shake the World” for her fearless reporting on the drug war.
Mar. 7, 2012
Daniel Salinas was arrested by state police and accused of trying to blackmail another mayoral candidate out of the race After getting out of jail, a judge ordered Salinas to stay away from city hall.
Mar. 7, 2012
The Theodore Roosevelt School in Ft. Apache, Arizona was a U.S. Army fort converted into a boarding school that sought to assimilate American Indians. A historian says many Native Americans would rather forget the school.
Mar. 7, 2012
Newly wealthy tribes are buying private land and asking the federal government to add it to their reservations, making it sovereign Indian territory. The consequence: local governments stand to lose vital tax revenue.
Mar. 7, 2012
The Department of Defense wants to know how warmer temperatures, forest fires and water shortages could affect military operations. And they’ve sought the help of the University of Arizona to be better prepared.
Mar. 6, 2012
Latinos, as a group, were among the hardest hit in the recession. But how are they faring as the economy slowly begins to recover?
Mar. 5, 2012
A new museum in Las Vegas tackles the history of something near and dear to the city's own roots: The Mob. Museum curators had the challenge of presenting a history that was never meant to be public.
Mar. 5, 2012
A University of San Diego report found that drug-related killings decreased along the border last year, even as violence grew across Mexico.
Mar. 2, 2012
Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio questioned the validity of President Obama's birth certificate at press conference Thursday. The sheriff's critics blasted the presentation, which took place during an election year and amid a federal investigation into civil rights allegations in Arpaio's department.
Mar. 2, 2012
Property near the Rio Grande River now sits empty. Whether reality or perception, the conversation abruptly ends when potential buyers learn the land is on the river's banks. The issue: the drug violence next door.
Mar. 2, 2012
Every student in the McAllen Independent School District district is about to get an iPad or iPod Touch that will replace traditional desktop computers. The cost would be about the same as purchasing new computers.
Mar. 1, 2012
Repossessing a car without a court order or the owner’s consent is legal in most of the country. But on the vast and isolated Navajo Nation, it can be a problem. A recent lawsuit charges that Navajo law makes the practice illegal.
Mar. 1, 2012
San Diego State University recently received a grant to study the links between climate change and infectious disease. They’re focusing their research on the Tijuana River Estuary, a major source of pollution in the border region.
Mar. 1, 2012
The number of Mexicans seeking political asylum in the United States has soared. But the number of people who succeed in receiving asylum is very low.
Mar. 1, 2012
After Arizona State Superintendent John Huppenthal ruled Tucson's Mexican-American Studies Program was illegal, he ordered a "prompt collection" of all instructional materials. Educators and writers oppose what they call a ban.
Feb. 29, 2012

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