Fronteras Desk News

Topics like illegal immigration and the housing crisis are prominent in the Southwest. Yet these complex topics can pose challenges to candidates trying to appeal to a broad audience.
Oct. 19, 2011
Increased enforcement of immigration laws - combined with a weak economy - have changed the landscape of the country's undocumented population.
Oct. 18, 2011
Elouise Cobell was the lead plaintiff in a lawsuit that accused the federal government of cheating Native Americans in its management of Indian land. Cobell never saw a dime of the $3.4 billion settlement.
Oct. 18, 2011
Previously, all trucks from Mexico had to stop after crossing the border and transfer the cargo to U.S. trucks. Now they’ll be able to continue inland. Labor unions fought the cross-border trucking program for years, citing safety concerns and it would take away jobs.
Oct. 18, 2011
On Tuesday, Republican presidential candidates are in Las Vegas preparing to face-off in the next primary debate. But a new poll finds many Latino voters don't have a strong favorable view of any of them.
Oct. 18, 2011
Some alternative newspapers get a large percentage of their advertising revenue from medical marijuana dispensaries. Now that U.S. attorneys in California are cracking down on these establishments, the weekly publications could feel the pain.
Oct. 17, 2011
There are currently more than 11,000 foreign convicts in the Lone Star State and about half are eligible for parole. A new law allows them to be deported home sooner if they are paroled.
Oct. 17, 2011
Protesters claim to represent the 99 percent of Americans who have been left behind by the country’s economic growth. So who are the other 1 percent – the top 1 percent?
Oct. 14, 2011
The clothing retailer Urban Outfitters is under fire for using the word “Navajo” to describe a line of clothing and products. The retailer said it currently has no plans to modify or discontinue any of the products.
Oct. 14, 2011
New research finds that birth rates are down across the country, but especially in states hard-hit by the recession and the housing crisis.
Oct. 14, 2011
With among the highest homicide rates in Mexico, Ciudad Juarez is about to launch a massive business, cultural and arts expo called “Juarez Competitiva.” Organizers want the event to attract businesses and tourism to the city ravaged by drug cartel violence.
Oct. 13, 2011
New data from the U.S. Census Bureau shows that 248 counties in 25 states will have to provide translated ballots and voting materials in the next election. That number is down from what was required following the 2000 census.
Oct. 13, 2011
A home in the heart of Tijuana that used to house drug-traffickers is now in the hands of a well known non-profit that helps children.
Oct. 13, 2011
Millions of international students get an education in the U.S. and then take their knowledge and skills home. The Obama administration says it wants to keep them here.
Oct. 12, 2011
In the final part of our ongoing series, we turn to the maguiladora workers. Many have enjoyed a higher standard of living thanks to the factory jobs. But a maquila advocacy group claims many have been subjected to years of exploitation.
Oct. 12, 2011
U.S. Senators from Arizona and Utah claim the ban is thwarting the creation of thousands of jobs. Officials at the Interior Department say that is false.
Oct. 12, 2011
The complaint accuses the defendant, who apparently lived in Texas, of traveling several times into Mexico to meet with an undercover informant working for the DEA. The informant posed as a member of a Mexican drug cartel.
Oct. 12, 2011
Fights over drawing new political districts are heating up in several states. In Nevada, the redistricting process has been described in a local newspaper editorial as a "train wreck."
Oct. 11, 2011
Over the weekend, California Gov. Jerry Brown signed two bills important to undocumented immigrants. The bills are also expected to impact the state's economy.
Oct. 10, 2011
The Navajo Generating Station, targeted for closure by environmentalists, faces a lease renewal and new, expensive EPA requirements. Many Navajos want it to stay, as they rely on the power plant and the coal mine that feeds it for jobs.
Oct. 10, 2011

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