Courting Justice In Mexico

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Mexico is on the brink of completing a major transformation of its judicial system. June 2016 will cap an eight-year effort to switch from a closed system of mostly written proceedings to one that opens up trials to the public.

Its goal is undoubtedly ambitious — to combat Mexico’s long history of impunity.

We explore its chances of success in a four-part series. Reporter Mónica Ortiz Uribe will be our guide.


Mexico is on the brink of completing a major transformation of its judicial system. Its goal is undoubtedly ambitious— to combat the country's long history of impunity.
Mexico is set to complete a total overhaul of its judicial system next month. It’s designed to help protect the rights of people accused of a crime. But when it comes to solving high profile cases, suspects are more likely to be mistreated.
Mexico's justice system has long been a pawn of the politically powerful. The problem persists even as the country transitions to a new judicial system that promises greater transparency.
Mexico is fast approaching a June deadline to complete a nationwide judicial reform. It replaces a closed system of written proceedings with one that opens up trials to the public and requires oral arguments before a judge. It also puts greater responsibility on police to come up with evidence that will stand up in court.