KJZZ News

Moratorium Lifted On San Tan Valley Water Hookups
One of the nation’s fastest growing real estate markets will face fewer restrictions on new homes this year.
Jan. 2, 2020
Remain In Mexico Expands To Nogales, Sonora
For the first time Thursday, U.S. Customs and Border Protection started sending asylum seekers back to Nogales, Sonora, to wait for their cases to process. It’s part of the Migrant Protection Protocols, also known as the “Remain In Mexico” program.
Jan. 2, 2020
Tucsons Raytheon Plant Begins New Air Force Contract
U.S. Air Force defense contractor Raytheon Company will build new medium range air-to-air missiles at its Tucson factory. The contract totals almost $800 million and comes just a week after another contract award for Tucson's largest employer.
Jan. 2, 2020
Phoenix Home Prices Rising Faster Than Any U.S. City
Home prices continue to rise across the country — in some cities more than others. For Phoenix, it's a lot more. In fact, the latest numbers show Phoenix with the highest home-price appreciation in the country.
Jan. 2, 2020
Chamber Study Blames State Retirement System For Teacher Pay Problems
It is the start of 2020, but for Arizona’s schools it’s still the 2019 year and another year-plus to go in funding teacher pay raises. But some state business leaders are already starting off this year fighting Gov. Ducey’s plan to raise teacher salaries twenty percent by the end of the 2020 school year.
Jan. 2, 2020
Women’s Rights Publication Spearheaded By Phoenix Poet Laureate
In the 19th century, suffragettes Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton needed to get the word out about the effort for women’s rights. So, what else? They started a newspaper. They called it The Revolution. Well, right now in Phoenix, there’s a new version of this revolutionary publication circulating. It’s called the Revolution Relaunch.
Jan. 2, 2020
Redistricting Puts Spotlight On Appellate Court Commission
The Commission on Appellate Court Appointments's 16 members are responsible for recommending judicial applicants to the governor and partisan applicants for the state's Independent Redistricting Commission to legislative leaders.
Jan. 2, 2020
Muralist Hugo Medina
Hugo Medina is an artist, sculptor and metal fabricator who’s made his mark on the Valley in a number of ways. But the most recognizable is probably his murals.
Jan. 2, 2020
Arizona Educators Make Progress With Opportunity Youth
"Opportunity youth" are 16- to 24-year-olds not working or going to school. While Arizona's numbers have improved, educators continue working to reach this population.
Jan. 2, 2020
What Californias Online Privacy Law Means For Arizona
California has passed consumer privacy landmark legislation that has far-reaching implications — even for those of us who don’t live in the Golden State.
Jan. 2, 2020
Arizona Collects $21.5M From Out-Of-State Merchants
In 2018, the Supreme Court ruled in the South Dakota v. Wayfair case that out-of-state merchants were subject to state taxes — even when that merchant didn’t have a brick and mortar presence in that state. Arizona has been collecting the additional taxes since last October, and revenue numbers for that month have come in at $21.5 million.
Jan. 2, 2020
Dr. Joseph Sirven: Important Medical Research Lost Amidst The Noise
It’s becoming easier and easier to get medical and scientific news, as more outlets and platforms report on more studies and breakthroughs. But is that helping us get the most important medical news? KJZZ medical commentator, Dr. Joe Sirven isn’t so sure. He’s a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic.
Jan. 2, 2020
Why Some Arizona Superfund Sites Have Been On The List For Decades
Nearly 40 years ago, the U.S. Superfund program was put into effect in an effort to clean up areas contaminated with hazardous material. But are Superfund sites a high enough priority? And what effect could climate change have?
Jan. 2, 2020
Q&AZ: Does Snow On The Four Peaks End Up In Our Drinking Water Supply?
Will the snow we’ve seen on Four Peaks this winter eventually end up in our drinking water? A listener asked about it through KJZZ's Q&AZ project. When the Four Peaks east of Phoenix turn white in the winter, it’s not only pretty to look at, it’s also a good sign for our water reserves.
Jan. 2, 2020
Hacienda Victims Attorney Files Civil Suit Against State, Doctors
It has been a year since an incapacitated woman at Hacienda Healthcare gave birth to a baby boy. The shocking delivery of her baby stunned the community. A month later, police arrested her alleged rapist, who was also her caregiver. Now, the woman’s attorney has filed a lawsuit against the state and the two doctors who were treating her during that time.
Jan. 2, 2020
The Takeaway: How Local, Federal Policies Criminalizing Homelessness
A recent U.S. Supreme Court decision upheld a lower federal court's ruling on civil rights for people experiencing homelessness. The Trump administration has assigned a new "homelessness czar." And President Donald Trump is mulling over an executive order that may empower local police to get rid of homeless encampments.
Jan. 2, 2020
Q&AZ: How Are Superior Court Judges Selected?
A listener wanted to know about Superior Court judges in Arizona and how they’re selected for office. Maricopa, Pima, Pinal and Coconino counties use a merit-based system.
Jan. 2, 2020
4 Navajo Code Talkers Die In 2019, 5 Remain
In 2019, four Navajo Code Talkers died. That leaves only five who live to tell the story of their historic legacy. In 1942, 29 Navajos developed an unbreakable code that led to the end of World War II. More than 400 Navajos then executed it.
Jan. 2, 2020
Flagstaff Will Pick Up Old Christmas Trees Jan. 6
The city of Flagstaff is reminding residents that its annual “treecycling” program will be picking up trees curbside Jan. 6. Dylan Lenzen, manager of the program, said the trees are shredded into chips for mulch and soil-like material that’s required to be deposited each day on top of landfills.
Jan. 2, 2020
As Winter Approaches, All Eyes Turn Toward Rocky Mountain Snowpack
The West’s water security is wrapped up in snow. When it melts, it becomes drinking and irrigation water for millions throughout the region. A high snowpack lets farmers, skiers and water managers breathe a sigh of relief, while a low one can spell long-term trouble.
Jan. 2, 2020

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