Environment

river sign
The Animas River is now open. It’s been more than a week since an EPA crew accidentally released toxic waste from an abandoned mine into the waterway. Downstream New Mexico and Navajo officials are holding off on opening the San Juan River.
August 15, 2015
Navajo farm
The Navajo farming authority has shut down irrigation for the rest of the season because of its concerns over contamination.
August 11, 2015
mine spill
The Navajo president has threatened to sue the EPA over the Colorado mine spill. Federal and tribal officials are setting up potable water stations and alerting communities to the contamination, as the toxic waste is making its way through the reservation.
August 11, 2015
EPA logo
The EPA unintentionally released about a million gallons of yellow sludge from a Colorado mine into the Animas River Thursday. Officials downstream blasted the agency for not initially taking the spill more seriously.
August 07, 2015
Universities across the Southwest are redesigning their campuses to make them more environmentally friendly. That includes one college transformation in West Texas that combines desert landscaping with Himalayan architecture.
July 15, 2015
City crews were cleaning up streets in parts of Nogales, Ariz., on Monday after monsoon rains caused the city’s main wash to flood.
July 13, 2015
Electric Reliability Council of Texas
Arizona is nation’s largest producer of solar energy per capita, in large part due to the state’s renewable energy mandate that forces utilities to buy solar and wind energy. But the state that leads the nation in wind power — Texas — is now flirting with the notion of eliminating its mandate, one that analysts say has paved the way for Texas to embrace wind power.
July 10, 2015
After years of record-breaking wildfires across the southwest, fire managers are finally catching their breath this season. A wetter-than-average spring is allowing them to focus on preventing mega-fires in the future.
June 26, 2015
Illegal Dump
This time of year long parades of tourists drive through the Hopi and Navajo Nations taking pictures of the painted desert, red sandstone buttes and desert wildflowers. What they often don’t see behind the rocks -- illegal dumpsites.
June 25, 2015
Lionel Tsosie
Native Americans hold eagle feathers as sacred and for centuries have used them in traditional ceremonies. Only members of federally recognized tribes are allowed to possess the feathers. But it’s not easy to obtain feathers legally. The Navajo Zoo is trying to change that.
June 11, 2015

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