Many people in the Southwest claim they have seen La Llorona or the weeping woman. People have spotted her along the Rio de Flag in Flagstaff all the way down to the San Pedro River near Tucson.
Hear More Untold Arizona Stories
Feb. 20, 2020
The Los Angeles City Council passed a motion Wednesday to take the next steps toward a clean-energy partnership with the Navajo Nation.
Feb. 19, 2020
A federal judge has given final approval to a multimillion dollar class-action settlement between Motel 6 and a Latino civil rights group. The case sprang from a 2017 story by Phoenix New Times about Motel 6 staff sharing guest information with federal immigration authorities.
Feb. 19, 2020
DREAMer Reflects On His Journey 15 Years After Winning Robotics Contest
Four undocumented teenagers from a Title I West Phoenix high school compete against the best engineers in the country from MIT with an underwater rover named Stinky — and win. It’s a made-for-Hollywood story that did, in fact, make those four "DREAMers" famous years later when it was made into a Hollywood film called “Spare Parts.”
Feb. 19, 2020
Vehicle Crossings At Arizona-Mexico Ports Fall For Second Year
The number of personal vehicles crossing into Arizona from Mexico fell last year, marking the second year of declines. One Nogales port authority representative chalked the drop up to staffing shortages and lane closures.
Feb. 18, 2020
Outrage In Mexico After Murder Of 7-Year-Old Girl
Last week, the gruesome murder of a woman in Mexico City sparked protests against the rise of femicides. And this week, the outcries against gender-based hate crimes continue after the abduction, rape and death of a 7-year-old girl.
Feb. 18, 2020
Navajo Nation Wants To Provide Power To LA
Navajo President Jonathan Nez will attend a Los Angeles City Council meeting Wednesday to discuss a proposed partnership. The tribe wants to provide the city with 500 megawatts of clean energy.
Feb. 18, 2020
The Story Of The Border Patrols So-Called Douglas Mafia
Twenty years ago, the Border Patrol was a small agency that didn’t get a lot of attention. But since the terrorist attacks of 9-11, the agency has nearly tripled in size and budget. A small group of agents, dubbed “the Douglas mafia,” rode that wave of growth to the top. ProPublica reporter Melissa del Bosque joined The Show to talk about her latest piece.
Feb. 18, 2020